THE HARD SCIENCE OF LOW CARB

The practice of Low Carb is as old as the hills but the science is quite new. Today we understand much more about why a Low Carb lifestyle is healthy and what the long-term benefits are.

More convincing evidence emerges regularly in support of a Low Carb lifestyle, yet there are many critics who point out weaknesses that are not supported by science, or who criticise Low Carb for other reasons, such as being unsustainable or a “fad diet”, or that protein causes kidney damage or meat causes diabetes. We hope this section provides a few references for you to judge from what we think are some of the best studies.

We know that Low Carb is very effective for obesity, Type 2 diabetes, fatty liver disease, high blood pressure, weight loss and cardiovascular disease.

But promising science is emerging in cancer therapy, cancer prevention, Alzheimer’s, other cognitive or neurological diseases, and in anti-ageing therapy. The science isn’t mature enough yet to make bold claims, but it’s coming. We predict that most people being treated for cancer in the future will be advised to adopt a ketogenic diet. We need more research on the exact protocols for different cancers, and how much difference it will make over time.

Based on the latest clinical studies, we believe the following health claims can be made today, supported by good evidence – either published clinical trials or good clinical outcomes over long periods:

Low Carb is effective for weight loss, blood sugar control, reversal of fatty liver and improvement of cardiovascular risk factors;
Low Carb supports cardiovascular health;
Low Carb may enhance conventional treatment for some types of cancer;
Low Carb diets can help reduce inflammation which is associated with a wide variety of diseases;
Carefully supervised very Low Carb diets can reverse the symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes and have been shown to reduce the number and amount of medication required by Type 2 Diabetics;
Low Carb diets are safe and suitable for Type 1 diabetics. The benefits are less glycemic volatility, lower insulin use, lower HbA1cs and less risk of hypoglycemia. Most importantly, Low Carb diets are associated with good long term outcomes for Type 1s and a lower risk of secondary complications;
Low Carb products are safe and suitable for diabetics (both Type 1 and Type 2)

*Please note that this website does not provide medical advice or recommendations. No statements and no information should be construed as such. Readers should consult their healthcare professional before altering their diet.

HERE ARE SOME VERY INTERESTING STUDIES...

COMPARING CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS OF TYPE 2 DIABETICS ON A STRICT LOW CARB DIET AGAINST A CONTROL SAMPLE

Cardiovascular disease risk factor responses to a type 2 diabetes care model including nutritional ketosis induced by sustained carbohydrate restriction at 1 year: an open label, non-randomized, controlled study

Publication: Cardiovascular Diabetology
Date: Published 1 May 2018
Authors: Nasir H. Bhanpuri et al
Our Summary: 12 month, non-randomised, controlled study of 349 mostly obese, Type 2 diabetic adults. Carbohydrate restricted (ie Low Carb) group improved most of their cardiovascular risk factors, including LDL cholesterol, blood pressure and inflammation.

COMPARING GLUCOSE OUTCOMES OF TYPE 2 DIABETICS ON A STRICT LOW CARB DIET AGAINST A CONTROL SAMPLE

Effectiveness and Safety of a Novel Care Model for the Management of Type 2 Diabetes at 1 Year: An Open-Label, Non-Randomized, Controlled Study

Publication: Diabetes Therapy
Date: April 2018, Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 583–612
Authors: Sarah J. Hallberg et al
Our Summary: 12 month, non-randomised, controlled study of 349 mostly obese, Type 2 diabetic adults. Carbohydrate restricted (ie Low Carb) group showed significant improvements in blood glucose levels, blood glucose control, weight loss and reduction in medication. The protocol proved safe with no adverse incidents attributed to the intervention. Cholesterol, liver and inflammatory markers also showed marked improvement.

COMPARING LOW CARB AGAINST LOW GLYCEMIC DIETS FOR TYPE 2 DIABETES

The effect of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-glycemic index diet on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus

Publication: Nutrition & Metabolism
Date: 19 December 2008
Authors: Eric C Westman et al
Our Summary: A very low carbohydrate diet led to greater improvements in blood glucose control, cholesterol and a greater reduction in medication compared with a low GI diet over a 24 week period.

COMPARING RANDOMIZED SAMPLES OF PEOPLE FOLLOWING LOW FAT, LOW CARB OR MEDITERRANEAN DIETS FOR WEIGHT LOSS AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK

Dietary Intervention to Reverse Carotid Atherosclerosis

Publication: Circulation
Date: Published 15 March 2010
Authors: Iris Shai et al
Our Summary: A two year study in which participants were randomized to 3 dietary intervention groups – Low Fat, Mediterranean and Low Carb. All groups showed weight loss, improvement in carotid vessel wall thickness (a measure of arterial plaque), lower blood pressure and improvements in cholesterol with the Low Carb group having a better improvement in some cholesterol factors.

A CAREFUL LOOK AT THE MECHANISMS AND EFFECT OF LOW CARB DIETS TO REVERSE NON-ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE

An Integrated Understanding of the Rapid Metabolic Benefits of a Carbohydrate-Restricted Diet on Hepatic Steatosis in Humans

Publication: Cell
Date: Published 6 March 2018
Authors: Adil Mardinoglu et al
Our Summary: A short term study of a low carbohydrate diet to measure the effects on the liver and other cardiometabolic factors in a small sample of obese subjects with Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. Rapid and dramtic reductions in liver fat were observed as well as improvements in cardiometabolic risk factors.

COMPARING DIFFERENT DIETS ON WEIGHT LOSS, METABOLIC AND CARDIOVASCULAR FACTORS

Comparison of the Atkins, Zone, Ornish, and LEARN Diets for Change in Weight and Related Risk Factors Among Overweight Premenopausal Women

Publication: JAMA
Date: Published 7 March 2007
Authors: Christopher D. Gardner, PhD et al
Our Summary: In a 12-month randomized study, partipants were allocated to one of 4 popular diets. After 12 months, the Low Carb Atkins diet outperformed all the others for weight loss and improvement of metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors.
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